Sunday, 22 January 2017

First Ladies of the United States

According to the White House, there has been 47 First Ladies.  Here are just a few:




Former model, Slovene-American, Melania Trump has become the 47th First Lady.   She is the second foreign-born First Lady, the other being Louisa Adams in 1825.


Lawyer and writer, Michelle Obama, was the first African-American to become First Lady.  She became a fashion icon, a role model and an advocate for the awareness of poverty.


American politician and former First Lady, Hillary Rodham Clinton, fought for gender equality and healthcare reform.   Her marriage survived the Monica Lewinsky scandal in 1998.



Elizabeth Ann "Betty" Ford was First Lady from 1974 to 1977.  She was the First Lady to announce that she had a long running battle with alcoholism and substance abuse and went on to establish the Betty Ford Centres.


Jackie Kennedy stated that her priority of First Lady was to take care of the President and their children but she also worked on promoting American art and preserving it's history as well as restoring the White House.


Eleanor Roosevelt was a politician, activist and diplomat and was the longest serving First Lady (March 1933 - April 1945).   Eleanor caused controversy being the first presidential wife to hold press conferences, write a daily newspaper column, a monthly magazine column, host a weekly radio show and speak at a national party convention.


Frances Folsom Cleveland-Preston was First Lady from 1886 to 1889 and again from 1893 to 1897.  She became First Lady at the age of 21 and remains the youngest wife of a sitting president.  She was  popular and regarded as a trendsetter.



Lucy Hayes was the first First Lady to hold a college degree.  A staunch opponent of slavery, she invited the first African-American professional musicians to appear at the White House.




London born Louisa Adams was First Lady from February 1775 to May 1852.  She met her husband, John Quincy Adams, at her father's house in Cooper's Row, near Tower Hill in London.



Martha Washington is considered to be the first First Lady.  She burned all correspondence written between herself and George before her death.


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